OPINION: Enjoy fruit and vegies, warts and all

Raelene HallMidwest Times
If a child hasn’t had the opportunity to see a vegetable that has grown a second or third “leg” and giggled at how it looks, then they haven’t lived.
Camera IconIf a child hasn’t had the opportunity to see a vegetable that has grown a second or third “leg” and giggled at how it looks, then they haven’t lived. Credit: Getty Images

When did Australians get so picky about fruit and vegetables?

When did we stop being so thankful for having clean, green and fresh produce from our own country (not imported) that we decided every piece had to be perfect.

What came first — our fussiness or supermarkets making us fussy?

Did the supermarket reject any produce that wasn’t perfect from growers and wholesalers, which led to us thinking if the supermarkets sold only produce without a single fault, that’s what we must have?

Or did we dictate to supermarkets by rejecting anything with the slightest blemish?

I won’t eat a rotten apple but a slight blemish on the skin doesn’t always equate to fruit that isn’t fit for eating.

The same applies to vegetables, such as carrots and potatoes.

The shape of the vegetable doesn’t dictate its taste and quality.

An extra-long potato is ideal for chips while round fat ones are great for baking in the jacket.

If a child hasn’t had the opportunity to see a carrot that has grown a second or third “leg” and giggled at how it looks and had great discussions about what it might resemble, then they haven’t lived.

It certainly doesn’t make it less edible.

Farmers dispose of endless amounts of produce every year because the “quality” isn’t good enough.

Quality, in my mind, has come to be equated with perfection, not fit for human consumption, which should be the true definition of whether we can eat it or not.

Unfortunately, I think it may be too late to reverse this trend.

I can’t see all supermarkets changing their purchasing to buy quality over perfection and, as a nation, I think we have gone too far, to learn and demand quality over perfection.

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