investigation

Federal election 2022: How every WA electorate voted, down to individual polling places

Kelly MeleshkoThe West Australian
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West Australian Labor MPs in Canberra: Matt Keogh, Tracey Roberts, Anne Aly, Zaneta Mascarenhas, Patrick Gorman, Madeline King, Tania Lawrence, Josh Wilson and Sam Lim.
Camera IconWest Australian Labor MPs in Canberra: Matt Keogh, Tracey Roberts, Anne Aly, Zaneta Mascarenhas, Patrick Gorman, Madeline King, Tania Lawrence, Josh Wilson and Sam Lim. Credit: Sean Davey/The West Australian

The Australian Electoral Commission has tallied the final votes from the 2022 Federal election — and there are clear winners across the WA electorates.

See which electorates came down to a handful of votes and which were easy wins.

Brand

Labor’s Madeleine King retained the seat she first won in 2016, which encompasses Kwinana and Rockingham city councils.

She is the only West Australian in Cabinet, having been named Minister for Resources and Northern Australia.

Burt

Labor’s Matt Keogh was reelected in Burt, which includes parts of the cities of Armadale, Canning and Gosnells.

The new Minister for Veterans Affairs and Defence Personnel has held Burt since the electorate was created in 2016.

Mr Keogh took 51.63 per cent of first preferences and won 65.21 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote, a 9.71 per cent swing in his favour since the 2019 election.

Canning

Liberal Andrew Hastie was reelected in Canning, which he has held since a 2015 by-election triggered by the death of Liberal MP Don Randall.

He won 43.81 per cent of first preferences compared to Labor’s Amanda Hunt on 32.78 per cent.

He took 53.59 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote, a swing against him of 7.97 per cent compared to the 2019 election.

Cowan

Labor’s Anne Aly was not expecting to claim victory on election night considering the close wins she had in 2016 and 2019.

In those elections she won the two-candidate preferred vote on margins of 1106 votes and 1417 respectively.

This time the margin was 21,566 votes.

The new Minister for Early Childhood Education and Minister for Youth took 46.86 per cent of first preference votes compared to Liberal Vince Connelly on 30.42 per cent.

In the two-candidate preferred count Dr Aly was on 60.82 per cent.

Curtin

In one of the closest contests in WA, Independent Kate Chaney won what was thought to be the safe Liberal seat of Curtin.

Previous MP Celia Hammond was ahead on first preferences, with 41.33 per cent compared with Ms Chaney’s 29.46 per cent.

But Ms Chaney was able to win the two-candidate preferred vote 51.26 per cent to 48.74 per cent.

Durack

Liberal Melissa Price held onto the enormous electorate of Durack, which covers the mid to northern part of the State.

Her support seemed stronger in the southern parts of the electorate, as polling places in Karratha, Port Hedland and Broome favoured Labor.

She won 34.33 per cent of first preference votes, a swing against her of more than 10 per cent compared to the 2019 election, with Labor’s Jeremiah Riley at 29.15 per cent.

Ms Price took 54.27 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote.

Forrest

Liberal Nola Marino retained Forrest, which covers WA’s South West. She has held the seat since 2007.

Ms Marino got 43.12 per cent of first preference votes compared to Labor’s Bronwen English on 27.44 per cent.

Despite a 10 per cent swing against her, she managed to win 54.29 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote.

Fremantle

Labor’s Josh Wilson easily won Fremantle; the third time he has been elected in the seat.

He took 43.97 per cent of first preferences compared to 24.22 per cent for Liberal Bill Koul, who suffered a 10.75 per cent swing against him.

Mr Wilson won 66.89 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote — compared to 56.92 per cent at the 2019 election.

Hasluck

Liberal Ken Wyatt had held Hasluck since 2010 but lost to Labor’s Tania Lawrence with a swing against him of almost 12 per cent on a two-candidate preferred basis.

Ms Lawrence won 39.73 per cent of first preferences compared with Mr Wyatt’s 33.39 per cent. She took 56 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote.

Moore

Moore was the closest race in WA, with a margin of fewer than 2000 votes at the time of writing.

Despite a significant swing against him, Liberal Ian Goodenough was able to hold onto the seat against Labor’s Tom French.

Mr Goodenough got 41.81 per cent of first preferences, with Mr French attracting 32.74 per cent.

In the end, Mr Goodenough was able to secure 50.66 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote, even after a 10.96 per cent swing against him.

O’Connor

In WA’s second-biggest electorate Liberal Rick Wilson cemented his fourth win, though also with a smaller margin than previously.

He won 44.76 per cent of first preferences compared to Labor’s Shaneane Weldon on 26.63 per cent.

Mr Wilson’s first preferences were actually slightly higher than in the 2019 election when he got 42 per cent.

But on a two-candidate preferred basis he won 56.97 per cent of the vote, compared to 65.41 per cent in 2019.

Pearce

Wanneroo councillor Linda Aitken was hoping to keep Pearce a Liberal seat after Christian Porter’s retirement but instead suffered a 14.23 per cent swing against the Liberals on a two-candidate preferred basis.

She got 29.9 per cent of first preferences compared to Labor’s Tracey Roberts on 42.77 per cent.

Ms Aitken wasn’t able to win the two-candidate preferred vote in any polling places, ultimately recording 40.96 per cent overall.

Perth

Swan stayed red for Patrick Gorman — not a huge surprise since the seat has been held by Labor since 1983.

He won the two-candidate preferred vote in all but one polling place, but that was a site where there were only three votes cast for the Perth electorate.

Mr Gorman won 39.25 per cent of first preferences, compared to Liberal David Dwyer on 27.07 per cent.

On a two-candidate preferred basis he won 64.8 per cent of the vote, a swing towards him of 11.57 per cent compared to 2019.

Swan

The Liberals were hoping to keep Swan after the retirement of MP Steve Irons, who held the seat since 2007.

Kristy McSweeney was able to win the two-candidate preferred vote in a handful of polling places in South Perth, Manning and Como but it wasn’t enough.

Labor’s Zaneta Mascarenhas won 39.07 per cent of first preferences compared to Ms McSweeney’s 32.08 per cent.

And an almost 12 per cent swing to Labor helped Ms Mascarenhas take 58.77 per cent of the two-candidate preferred vote.

Tangney

Ex-police officer Sam Lim won the contest in Tangney for Labor from Liberal Ben Morton.

Mr Morton got 39.99 per cent of first preferences compared to Mr Lim’s 38.07 per cent.

But Mr Lim came out in front on the two-candidate preferred vote, benefiting from an 11.88 per cent swing against the Liberals to win 52.38 per cent.

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