Peel-based husband and wife tourism business Salt and Bush sign international climate change declaration

Kasper Johansen Mandurah Coastal Times
A Peel-based eco tourism business is hoping to make a big impact on climate change after signing a declaration that aims to cut tourism emissions in half over the next decade.
Camera IconA Peel-based eco tourism business is hoping to make a big impact on climate change after signing a declaration that aims to cut tourism emissions in half over the next decade. Credit: catazul/Pixabay (user catazul)

Though small in size a Peel-based eco tourism business is hoping to make a big impact on climate change after signing a declaration that aims to cut tourism emissions in half over the next decade.

Peel-based eco-tour business Salt and Bush is one of 400 tourism businesses globally to sign the Glasgow Declaration on Climate Action in Tourism, organised by environmental group One Planet Network.

Each signatory must follow five “pathways” to aid in climate action as well as commit to deliver a concrete climate action plan, or updated plan, within 12 months of signing.

Tour guide Jamie Van Jones hiking in Yalgorup National Park
Camera IconTour guide Jamie Van Jones hiking in Yalgorup National Park Credit: Supplied/Mandurah Coastal Times

Co-director of Salt and Bush Jamie Van Jones said the business wanted to go “one step further” and align with the global tourism movement and no longer be silent and inactive in the face of a “global climate emergency”.

“Aligning our business actions with our core values is needed now more than ever, so we have committed to actions that we will pursue as we develop and grow as a business,” she said.

There is no longer time to be silent and inactive in the face of a climate emergency.

Jamie Van Jones

According to the United Nations-run World Tourism Organization, tourism-based carbon dioxide emissions could rise by 25 per cent or more by 2030, compared to 2016.

Owners Jamie Van Jones and Sebastian Jones
Camera IconOwners Jamie Van Jones and Sebastian Jones Credit: Supplied/Mandurah Coastal Times

The husband-and-wife duo lost their international expedition guiding jobs due to the pandemic, which led them to the eco-tourism industry, with their business supporting not-for-profit environmental charity — founded by the couple — Swanlandia Inc. which hosts eco-educational workshops, conservation projects, and a nature club for children.

Ms Jones said the not-for-profit shares and educates people about the “amazing” environment and takes steps to protect the environment locally.

“We aspire to run our home and office off solar power and invest in an electric vehicle to ensure we are reducing our emissions and offsetting the emissions we can’t eliminate,” she said.

The Glasgow Declaration comes after the Conference of the Parties held earlier this year, which laid out targets to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero as soon as possible before 2050.

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