Student doctors work in Carnarvon to get a taste of country medicine.

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Lisa FavazzoMidwest Times
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The Rural Clinical School of Western Australia Academic officer Stephanie Condo, Carnarvon deputy president Burke Maslen, medical coordinator Dr An Ramon, Ankith Nair, Andrew Hall, medical coordinator Dr Kees Bakker, Jessica Knight, Marcelle Fisher. ( Academic Officer), Burke Maslen Deputy President Shire of Carnarvon, Dr An Ramon Medical Coordinator, Ankith, Andrew, Dr Kees Bakker Medical Coordinator, Jessica and Marcelle at the Welcoming function
Camera IconThe Rural Clinical School of Western Australia Academic officer Stephanie Condo, Carnarvon deputy president Burke Maslen, medical coordinator Dr An Ramon, Ankith Nair, Andrew Hall, medical coordinator Dr Kees Bakker, Jessica Knight, Marcelle Fisher. ( Academic Officer), Burke Maslen Deputy President Shire of Carnarvon, Dr An Ramon Medical Coordinator, Ankith, Andrew, Dr Kees Bakker Medical Coordinator, Jessica and Marcelle at the Welcoming function Credit: Supplied,

Four doctors-to-be took the 10-hour drive up WA’s coast to Carnarvon last Tuesday looking for a taste of rural medicine.

UWA students Jessica Knight and Ankith Nair, Notre Dame student Marcelle Fisher, and Curtin University student Andrew Hall will be completing the second last year of their medical studies from the road while working with the Carnarvon Health Service.

 Since arriving in town, the students attended a welcome party at the One Mile Jetty Cafe, taken their shot at the local pistol club, had a ride in the St John Ambulance, visited the Gwoonwardu Mia Cultural Centre and started exploring the Gascoyne’s coastline.

Student Andrew Hall said: “We look forward to working alongside the fantastic hospital staff and exploring Carnarvon, arguably one of the most beautiful spots in Western Australia.”

The Rural Clinical School of WA has sent students to regions for clinic experience for almost two decades, with about 16 students travelling to Carnarvon over the program's life.

Academic officer Stephanie Condo said providing students with these kinds of experiences helped spread awareness about what rural and regional medicine could offer as a career pathway.

“We always do our best to welcome students and show them how much Carnarvon has to offer,” she said.

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